STILL NEVER THE SAME (2015), 17 minutes, color, silent, video

In 2005, I was in the middle of college, trying to figure out how to make art and how to engage meaningfully with both the histories and futures of artist cinema. Or experimental film. Or video art. Or media art. Or whatever I was calling it then and am calling it now. I made a piece - my first big one - called NTSC. The entire fifteen minute video was made from the generative possibilities of Final Cut Pro, mostly color bars with a bit of static. Psychedelic and slippery, it was a piece that consumed me during its making and enabled me to forge a much stronger sense of my interests and the possibilities of the media.

Now, a decade deeper into making art, that piece acts as a fascinating portal into a younger artists's concerns and enthusiasms. Some things are the same, some things have been abandoned, a number of things have been added. STILL NEVER THE SAME is a remix, a reconsideration, a retrieval, a reconvening. NTSC is still inside of it, but it's also changed and shifted. The constraints are similar, but distinct: taking the original piece and treating it as found; maintaining and enhancing old fascinations while forging a space for new ones.

Made for Test Patterns at Flux Factory and subsequently exhibited at the 2016 Chicago Underground Film Festival.

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NTSC (2005), 15 minutes, color, silent, video

Digital Video Collaboration with Final Cut Pro. All images are the product of generative possibilities within the program: nothing imported, nothing shot, one part static, seven thousand color bars and a yuga's worth of make believe. I've heard and even said "this pizza is a metaphor" ("you can put crazy toppings on your pizza") and this is the kind of new place that reminds you of your inscriptive powers and of the vastness contained in a (turn)ons-and-offs or a zza party's parting gifs. A landscape for a cybernetic future in which human perception/experience/sensation is administered algorithmically. There are moments in these parallel futures though that have the capacity to blow brains to bits and that's ok, yeah, that's kinda the point.